At the international level, there are two important open source databases developed by international organizations of policymakers and businesses: it is usually multinationals, as well as domestic companies, that work for free trade agreements, as they are well prepared to use different business environments in different countries and can then act and invest without borders. Free trade agreements play an important role in the globalization process, as they prepare for global free trade and create production chains that can pass through several countries (global purchases). The literature distinguishes between different levels of regional cooperation. Bela Balessa (Balessa 1961: 2; Balessa 1987: 43) proposes five levels: as soon as the agreements go beyond the regional level, they need help. The World Trade Organization is intervening on this point. This international body contributes to the negotiation and implementation of global trade agreements. Generally speaking, trade diversion means that a free trade agreement would divert trade from more efficient suppliers outside the area to less efficient suppliers within territories. On the other hand, the creation of trade implies that a free trade agreement creates trade that might not otherwise have existed. In any case, the creation of businesses will improve the national well-being of a country. [15] Additional ancillary agreements have been adopted to allay concerns about the potential effects of the contract on the labour market and the environment. Critics feared that, in general, low wages in Mexico would attract U.S.

and Canadian companies, leading to a relocation of production to Mexico and a rapid decline in manufacturing jobs in the United States and Canada. Meanwhile, environmentalists were worried about the potentially disastrous effects of rapid industrialization in Mexico, which has no experience in implementing and enforcing environmental legislation. Potential environmental issues were addressed in the North American Agreement on Environmental Cooperation (NAAEC), which established the Commission for Environmental Cooperation (CEC) in 1994. These occur when one country imposes trade restrictions and no other country responds. A country can also unilaterally ease trade restrictions, but this rarely happens. This would put the country at a competitive disadvantage. The United States and other developed countries are only doing this as a kind of foreign aid to help emerging countries strengthen strategic industries that are too small to be a threat. Many critics of NAFTA have viewed the deal as a radical experiment developed by influential multinationals trying to increase their profits at the expense of ordinary citizens of the countries involved.

Opposition groups have argued that the horizontal rules imposed by NAFTA could undermine local governments by preventing them from legislating or legislating to protect the public interest. Critics have also argued that the treaty would lead to a significant deterioration in environmental and health standards, promote the privatization and deregulation of important public services, and supplant family farmers in signatory countries. In the first two decades of the agreement, regional trade increased from about $290 billion in 1993 to more than $1.1 trillion in 2016. Critics disagree on the net impact on the United States…